Schools‎ > ‎High School‎ > ‎Courses‎ > ‎

Math

There are two sequences of mathematics classes for students to select. 


MATH SEQUENCE 1 General Diploma 


Math I A, Math I B, Math IC (3 trimesters, 1.5 credit, grades 9-10) 

Math 1 A/B/C are trimester courses to include introductory Algebra I topics including working with real numbers, solving single variable equations, and graphing linear functions—topics traditionally covered in Prealgebra. This will be the lowest level math course available for incoming freshman, and others not prepared for a traditional Algebra I course. Placement is by teacher recommendation. 


Math II A & Math II B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 10-12) 

Prerequisite: Math I A/B/C or teacher recommendation 

Math II will include topics of basic concepts of Algebra I inequalities and proofs, linear equations, polynomials, and rational expressions, and introductory Algebra II concepts. Students currently in Integrated Math proceed to this course. 


Applied Geometry A & Applied Geometry B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 11-12) 

Prerequisite: Math I A/B 

Geometry deals with concepts of the Euclidean plane and space. Topics will include parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, right triangles, circles, areas and volume, coordinate geometry, trigonometry, construction, and similar polygons. The focus in geometry is to introduce the student to formal proof and to give the valuable geometric background which is so important for application to other subjects. The student successfully completing this course should be ready to continue in Algebra II the next year. 


Math III A & Math III B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 10-12) 

Prerequisite: Math II A/B 

Math III will include irrational and complex numbers, quadratic equations, inverse equations, polynomial equations, analytic geometry, and exponential and logarithmic functions, and other topics traditionally covered in the first semester of Algebra II. 


MATH SEQUENCE 2 College Preparatory 


Algebra I A & Algebra I B (2 trimesters, 1.0 credit, grades 8-10) 

Algebra 1 A is the first class of a 4-year sequence for the college-bound student; however, a major concern of Algebra I is to make sure that the program accommodates a wide range of student abilities and interests. The course covers topics such as operations with real numbers, solving linear equations, graphing relations and functions, systems of equations, factoring polynomials, rational expressions, radicals, and quadratic equations. 


Geometry A & Geometry B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 9-11) 

Prerequisite: Algebra I A/B 

Geometry deals with concepts of the Euclidean plane and space. Topics will include parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, right triangles, circles, areas and volume, coordinate geometry, trigonometry, construction, and similar polygons. The focus in geometry is to introduce the student to formal proof and to give the valuable geometric background which is so important for application to other subjects. The student successfully completing this course should be ready to continue in Algebra II the next year. 


Algebra II A & Algebra II B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 10-12) 

Prerequisite: Geometry A/B 

Algebra II will cover such topics as linear equations, polynomials, functions, rational expressions, analytic geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, series and sequences, matrices and determinants, and trigonometry. It is important that the student acquire a high level of understanding of these topics in order to be ready for the fourth year of high school mathematics which is Precalculus. Since mathematics builds on previously learned symbols, concepts, and skills, it is important that the student view this course as necessary for any further development in mathematics in high school, trade school, or college. 


Precalculus A & Precalculus B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 11-12) 

Prerequisite: Algebra II A/B 

Precalculus will prepare the student for entrance into a college calculus course. Topics of study will include coordinate geometry, polynomials, functions, exponents and logarithms, trigonometric function, polar coordinates, conic sections, sequences and series, limits, and an introduction to calculus. This important class will lay the groundwork for any further study of mathematics in high school or college. Students who take this course in the 11th grade should then plan to take Calculus in the senior year. 


AP Calculus A/B/C (3 trimesters, 1.5 credit, grade 12) 

Prerequisite: Precalculus A/B 

Introduction to Calculus is designed to give students an intuitive understanding of the basic concepts in calculus. Students should understand that this class will not be the same as that which would be found in Calculus I at the university level. The student should not be under the impression that it will be possible to side-step the first semester calculus course in college. Topics will include sequences and series, functions, logarithms, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and applications of the integral and derivative. Students in AP Calculus should be aware that this is a college level course culminating with the AP exam in May. A 

satisfactory score on the AP exam will, in most cases, result in college credit for the first semester of calculus. For further information visit collegeboard.com 

Calculus A (first trimester) will provide the mathematical background needed for Calculus B and AP Calculus. Concepts are presented and explored from algebraic, graphical, and numerical perspectives. Students are expected to actively participate in the development of all concepts. Basic concepts covered include numerical patterns, polynomial and rational functions, complex numbers, analytic geometry, systems of equations, statistics and probability, limits and continuity, and trigonometry. 

Calculus B and AP Calculus C will be primarily concerned with developing an understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed in multiple ways: geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations are also important. Through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics. 

Students and teacher use technology regularly to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. Each student should have a graphing scientific calculator. Cost and features vary ($80-$130). Suitable machines include the TI-83 Plus, TI-86, or TI-89, but other brands and models will suffice. 


Probability and Statistics (1 trimester, .5 credit, grades 11-12) Prerequisite: Algebra II 

Probability will include the study of determining the likelihood of events occurring. Applications in gambling (i.e. lottery) and business models will be reviewed. Statistics concepts will involve the analysis of the central tendencies of data sets. Projects may include problems from biology (i.e. deer population studies), business (i.e. trends in car sales), or politics (i.e. election models). Students interested in pursuing careers in business or research should seriously consider this course. Many real-world scenarios will be used to develop the concepts in each area studied. This course will also provide practice with many of the concepts included on the Michigan Merit Exam. 


Personal Finance A/B (2 trimesters, 1 credit, grades 11-12) 

Prerequisite– 2 credits of math 

This course will teach the skills necessary to make sound personal economic decisions: budgeting income; borrowing and buying on credit; choosing savings instruments, stocks, bonds, real estate and other investments; life insurance; annuities; buying or renting a house; and use of financial institutions.